Category Archives: Robotics

What is the next evolution of Process Robotics?

The Feb 15, 2019
The By Simon Shah, Chief Marketing Officer, Redwood Software

The use of software-based robotics and automation to carry out common tasks that make up the plethora of business processes is what we’ve been doing in one form or another at Redwood for 25 years. But the nature of RPA is not one that is static, it’s one of continual evolution.

For RPA users, it means the way they assess the potential costs and benefits of deploying RPA has changed – it’s no longer good enough to simply be able to remove the human effort from a single process, or set of processes.

Newer RPA alternatives, however, has ushered in new capabilities that allow businesses to robotize as many or few back- and middle-office tasks as are required – whether that’s a focused function, or end-to-end automation. The key point is to provide that flexibility and to do so more easily than ever before. And without the need for unnecessary human input or significant resources.

To achieve this, robotics solutions need to encompass some core capabilities and characteristics:

  • They must be easily scalable in a linear way. Getting locked into a cycle of hardware upgrades and software licensing requirements isn’t going to help you bring down TCO or deliver against your automation targets.
  • They must use a transparent, predictable pricing model – not being able to accurately predict robotics and automation costs is bad for the industry’s reputation and bad for customers.
  • They must incorporate ready-to-use process components to allow the business to create automated processes while eliminate significant development and maintenance costs.

Crucially though, what sets RPA apart is the ability to truly augment – rather than simply replicate – the work of humans. The notion of a cobot – a collaborative robot – is technology that’s designed to enhance human capabilities, to enable us to do more, not to replace people entirely.

The definition of RPA 2.0 is likely to vary a little in the technical specifics. For example, does it need to involve artificial intelligence or machine learning? That depends who you ask. But what it should mean to businesses is scalable, predictable process automation without the need for third-party add-ons, sprawling technical development teams or the doubt caused by opaque pricing practices.

Where each nascent piece of technology fits into that picture – and how they can best be combined – is still being worked out. But with a focus on measurable outcomes, businesses can ensure they’re always getting the best out of their robotics solutions.

If RPA was replicating human effort, robotics is all about augmenting it.

7 Key Technology Trends Emerging in the Travel Industry for 2019 (Videos)

Via Refine.com, a revenue management blog | No date

For businesses in the travel industry, as well as their customers, technology plays a vital role. It has the capacity to increase the efficiency of business operations and also improve the customer experience, but it is critical that hotels and other companies keep up-to-date with the emerging technology trends so they do not fall behind competitors. In this article, you will find details about seven of the most important tech trends in today’s tourism industry.

1. Internet of Things (IoT)

One of the most exciting emerging technology trends is the Internet of Things (IoT), which involves internet-based inter-connectivity between everyday devices, allowing them to both send and receive data. Already, we are seeing examples of its role within the travel and tourism industry and this is only going to increase.

For instance, IoT technology can be used in hotel rooms to provide customers with a device that connects to everything from the lights, to the heaters and air conditioning, allowing all to be controlled from one place. In airports, meanwhile, luggage cases can be installed with sensors that will alert passengers when they pass by.

Example: Smart technology smarter airports

 

Find more detailed information about the ‘Internet of Things’ in the travel industry in the article “How the Internet of Things (IoT) can Benefit the Travel Industry”.

2. Recognition Technology

Finally, recognition technology is especially interesting within this list of key tech trends, due to its potential for removing friction from purchases and making interactions seamless. The technology itself includes finger print recognition, facial recognition, retina scanning and various other biometric identifiers.

Such technology is already being used in some hotels to allow access to rooms via finger prints, or to allow for semi-contactless check-outs. However, in the future, it is hoped that this technology may be able to allow for customers to pay for meals in the hotel restaurant simply by walking through the exit.

Example: Facial Recognition Check-in in Marriott China

 

Find more detailed information and examples about facial recognition use cases in the travel industry in the article “4 Ways Facial Recognition Can Be Used in the Travel Industry”.

3. Virtual Reality (VR)

Virtual reality has exploded in recent years, with increased availability of virtual reality headsets as home entertainment products. While much of the excitement has focused on video games, businesses and marketers have also made use of the technology, especially in terms of interactive 360 degree images and videos.

It is one of the most promising tech trends for tourism-related companies, because it allows them to digitally transport customers to a virtual recreation of a specific place. This affords hotels the opportunity to showcase their rooms, reception areas and even local tourist hotspots on their website, in order to encourage bookings.

Example: The world’s first Virtual Reality travel search and booking experience

 

Find more detailed information and examples about how virtual reality can benefit your business in the article “How Virtual Reality is Transforming the Travel Industry”.

4. Augmented Reality (AR)

Augmented reality is similar to virtual reality, but involves augmenting a person’s real surroundings, rather than replacing them. One of the major plus points of this particular technological trend is that it is cheaper than VR, with users requiring only a smartphone or tablet device which has access to the internet.

Through graphical overlays, those in the tourism industry can greatly enhance the customer experience, providing customers with valuable information or even pure entertainment. For instance, apps can allow for photographs to be augmented through filters and effects. Details about local destinations can also be displayed as a customer points their smartphone at them, providing information at the exact time that it is most relevant.

Example: Augmented reality within the hospitality industry

 

Find more detailed information and examples about how augmented reality can benefit your business in the article “How Augmented Reality is Revolutionising the Travel Industry”.

5. Robotics

Even a decade ago, the idea of robots being deployed regularly within the travel industry would have seemed like the work of a science fiction writer. Yet, it is becoming increasingly prevalent, with artificially intelligent robots, often equipped with speech recognition technology, being used in place of information points by chains like Hilton.

Robots are also utilised for a variety of other reasons. For example, in airports, they can be used to detect concealed weapons, while some manufacturers are also using robotics to create luggage cases that intelligently follow you. Moreover, travel agents are using robots for pre-screening, making waiting times more productive for customers.

Example: Autonomous Security Robots

 

Find more detailed information and examples about robot use cases in the travel industry in the article “Robots in the Travel Industry: 8 Real-World Examples”.

6. Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Away from robots, artificial intelligence is being used in other ways too. Perhaps the most obvious use within the travel industry is for customer service purposes, with chatbots possessing the ability to deliver rapid response times to problems or queries. It is also able to continuously learn from interactions with customers.

In addition, hotels and other companies operating in the tourism industry can make use of artificial intelligence to accurately and continuously sort through data. It will be able to draw conclusions about business performance or trends associated with customer satisfaction, and even intelligently manage inventories.

Example: Create Your Bot Booking Travel

 

Find more detailed information and examples about artificial intelligence use cases in the travel industry in the article “How Artificial Intelligence is Changing the Travel Industry”.

7. Big Data

In the modern tourism industry, big data is a fact of life, and almost all companies that are successful employ their own data collection techniques. One of the biggest uses for this data is to improve personalisation, with travel companies using the information they gather to make specific adjustments to their offerings.

Another valuable use for data is to analyse current business performance. In particular, hotel owners can use big data for revenue management purposes, using historic occupancy rates and other past trends to better anticipate levels of demand. When demand is predictable, pricing and promotional strategies can also be optimised.

Example: Big Data and predictive analysis

 

Find more detailed information and examples about big data in the travel industry in the article “5 Ways Big Data Can Benefit the Travel Industry”.

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5 Technology Trends Impacting State and Local Governments

Contributed by the Community Editorial Team at Comcast Business
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March 01, 2018

State and local governments stand at the cusp of a technology renaissance, as new offerings and services are available to help agencies serve their constituents faster, more effectively and more efficiently. Technologies that once were thought of as “bleeding edge” now are increasingly ubiquitous, enabling government agencies to become more customer-centric in myriad ways, from answering billing queries to proactively identifying when customer data is being targeted by cybercriminals.

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According to research firm Gartner, government CIOs expect to spend 28 percent of their 2018 budget on digital initiatives designed to increase the value of government to constituents.[1] Technologies such as analytics, automation, artificial intelligence and even autonomous vehicles all have the potential to enable governments to offer services and aid their citizens in ways that not only can improve the customer experience, but also save governments time, money and labor.

Imagine logging on to a government website and being “recognized” through facial recognition, then “telling” the site what you’re looking for in plain English and receiving the results instantly. Or imagine a self-driving maintenance truck that “sniffs out” and automatically fills potholes without human intervention.

On the surface, this may sound like the stuff of science fiction. But these scenarios are coming closer to being reality, as technologies such as artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles are moving closer to the mainstream. And their effect on state and local governments would be transformational in providing services and keeping citizens safe from physical and cyber perils.

TECHNOLOGIES TO WATCH

The scope of technologies that can impact government services—and, in turn, our lives—is far-reaching, from robots that clean parks to systems that can create personalized cybersecurity by observing and learning from users’ behaviors. Some technologies are still more bleeding-edge than leading-edge, while others have the potential to be in service—and of service—today.

Five technologies in particular—artificial intelligence and robotics, autonomous vehicles, digital government, automation, and efforts to increase cybersecurity—demonstrate value to state and local government initiatives.

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS

Of all the technologies that can reap the largest benefit for governments, artificial intelligence is perhaps the one most likely to have the biggest impact. In fact, a number of agencies already are using AI to handle tasks quickly that otherwise would take much longer for humans to do, such as sorting through massive amounts of paperwork to find relevant information.

Law enforcement agencies are looking at artificial intelligence as a weapon to help fight crime by improving video surveillance, spotting criminals in crowds through facial recognition, and even helping reduce the amount of time police officers spend writing reports.

Beyond artificial intelligence, robotics is becoming a way for agencies to spend less and do more. Consultancy firm Deloitte highlights the coming of process robotics, which it describes as “… computer-coded, rules-based software that uses ‘bots’ to automate repetitive, rules-based tasks otherwise performed by humans. Requiring minimal system integration, bots can be deployed in as little as a few weeks depending on the complexity of the process.”[2] Any high-volume, rules-based work can be performed by process robotics, which helps free employees to focus on more valuable customer-facing activities.

Bots are already being used by agencies to help improve customer service. Chatbots in particular are being used to answer questions via the web without the need for customer service agents—a technology especially useful for agencies that are understaffed and don’t have dedicated customer-facing employees.

Deloitte estimates that employing AI technology in the government space could free up as many as 1.2 billion working hours every year, saving $41.1 billion.[3]

AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

While much of the conversation around government and autonomous vehicles has focused on legislating such technology, governments can benefit from the use of autonomous vehicles in multiple ways. Another Deloitte study notes that, as end users, agencies not only can improve their government-operated fleets, but also further the concepts of shared mobility and “other new types of travel through their procurement decisions.”[4]

The federal government operates a fleet of more than 600,000 vehicles, including U.S. Postal Service trucks and General Services Administration vehicles leased to various agencies.[5] In 2016, USPS vehicles were involved in about 30,000 accidents nationwide, resulting in about $67 million in repair and legal costs.[6] As a result, the agency is considering autonomous vehicles for its fleet, not only to help improve safety but also to increase productivity of letter carriers, who could ready the mail for deliveries during transit.

At the state and local level, highway maintenance departments could dispatch autonomous trucks to repair road damage such as potholes or broken curbs, clean debris from roads following a collision or events such as a parade, or clear snow and ice from roadways during inclement weather. Public transportation can also be a potential target for autonomous vehicles to help municipalities save on labor costs while keeping their fleets moving.

While autonomous vehicles can have the ability to negatively impact state and local budgets—the amount of revenue generated by traffic tickets is certain to decrease due to anticipated safer driving by autonomous vehicles—governments potentially have more to gain than lose from the technology, including decreased labor costs, increased productivity and lower legal costs related to vehicle accidents.

DIGITAL GOVERNMENT

The term “digital government” is an umbrella term used to describe technologies such as mobile services, common online identities and crowdsourcing—all designed to streamline services and improve the end-user experience.

Mobility in particular is an area where governments at all levels can increase the quality of their services and the efficiency of their employees. Apps can be used to access information quickly and easily, enabling citizens to, for example, see in real time where tree-trimming crews are slowing traffic or virtually check in to the local DMV office to avoid waiting in line. Mobile apps also can help government employees working offsite and in the field. Building inspectors can get instant access to building plans, permit applications and more, for example. Parks and recreation department workers can see the location and working status of every water fountain connected to an internet of things (IoT) sensor. And transportation department employees can remotely change the status of digital signage to alert motorists of changing traffic conditions.

Back-office systems that facilitate common identities for constituents also can help improve the user experience, especially when dealing with multiple agencies. Much like users can log on to various websites by connecting with social media sites such as Facebook, government agencies can use common identity systems to help simplify the process of accessing various agency sites to accomplish tasks, such as checking on the status of a request filed with the zoning commission or filing a police report for a hit-and-run traffic accident.

Crowdsourcing, once the purview of sites that harness user opinions to make recommendations on restaurants, hotels and more, is now joining the government fray, as more agencies are depending on the “wisdom of the crowd” to help collect and disseminate information. The federal government has established a site, citizenscience.gov, to help agencies encourage public participation to accelerate innovation. It features federal citizen science efforts in climatology, ecology and disaster response, among others, to help “engage the American public in addressing societal needs and accelerating science, technology, and innovation,” according to the site. At the state and local level, crowdsourcing can be used by agencies to gather real-time traffic information, monitor power outages and collect other data important to citizens, providing facts to the minute and on the fly.

AUTOMATION

Consultancy firm KPMG pegs automation as “the next step in government’s digital transformation,”[7] and with good reason: Automation is perhaps the most useful technology in terms of impacting government services from both the agency and the constituent perspectives. In particular, process automation can free employees from mundane tasks such as filing paperwork to concentrate on more meaningful projects or tasks that require their full attention, such as addressing constituent issues.

Automation is one step below artificial intelligence on the technology ladder; however, interest in “intelligent automation” is growing as a way to further enhance productivity while improving accuracy. Chatbots are a simple example of intelligent automation, while IBM’s Watson with its cognitive analytics, which has the ability to learn and solve problems, offers a prime example of more complex intelligent automation.

Automation is not a new concept in government or other industries, for that matter. However, as advances in artificial intelligence and robotics continue, automation will take on a much more important role in helping governments run efficiently and providing more valuable citizen services.

EFFORTS TO INCREASE CYBER SECURITY

As more processes and constituent interactions occur digitally, governments must do more to protect sensitive and valuable data from cyber threats. No longer should agencies worry about whether their systems will be breached; rather, they should worry about when their systems will be breached.

Researchers estimate damages from cyber crime will amount to $6 trillion worldwide annually by 2021.[8] Included in that amount are damage and destruction of data, embezzlement, stolen money, restoration and deletion of hacked data and systems, lost productivity, theft of intellectual property, forensic investigation, theft of personal and financial data, fraud, post-attack disruption to the normal course of business, and reputational damage.

As cyber threats continue to surge, so does the demand for qualified cyber security talent. However, a recent study by the Center for Cyber Safety and Education predicts there will be a worldwide shortage of 1.8 million skilled security workers by 2022.[9] Agencies must look for new and innovative ways, then, to secure their data and keep their systems safe from breaches and malicious activity.

The cloud is emerging as one tool in the fight against cyber crime, as technologies such as cloud workload protection platforms show promise in keeping data protected no matter where data resides—on-premises, in virtual machines or in cloud environments. Deception technologies, which are designed to throw off a would-be attacker, also can help, as well as endpoint detection and response solutions and network traffic analysis capabilities.

Artificial intelligence shows the biggest promise in improving cyber security, and is the technology upon which many of the new security solutions are based. It is evident that artificial intelligence will serve as the backbone for many, if not most, of the technologies powering the next generation of government services.

HOW THE NETWORK MATTERS WITH NEW-GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES

State and local governments are quickly reaching the point where adoption of new technologies is inevitable. Indeed, the efficiency and effectiveness of any government agency is dependent on the technologies it uses to provide services and protect the health and welfare of its citizens.

In preparing for their impending technology renaissance, agencies first must prepare their networks to certify they are able to handle the increase in demand. Artificial intelligence, cognitive computing, mobility and other technologies can stress the bandwidth of traditional networks and impact performance.

Agencies need to ascertain if they have the right foundation for both customer-facing and back-office operations, as well as new opportunities yet to be imagined. Today’s efficient networks comprise multiple technologies and platforms all chosen to ensure the solutions they support operate at peak performance without issue.

In building a network for the next generation of government services, agencies should consider an environment that includes both on-premises, cloud, and networking technologies such as SD-WAN and high-speed broadband to make certain traffic is handled efficiently over any type of network. And networking components such as WiFi and unified communications can ensure users of the network—employees and constituents—interact with each other using their preferred method of communication.

To help ease stress on an agency’s current network—not to mention the daily burden on IT managers—managed services can be utilized to offer certain constituent services, such as bill payments, without further impacting the network. Managed services can be used to help tie disparate systems together and “fill in the gaps” as agencies update their current infrastructure, and can prove useful even after networks have been upgraded.

Working with a network service provider can help ease the burden associated with building and maintaining a network capable of handling the bandwidth-intensive needs of the next generation of government services. By working with a third-party network services provider, agencies can leverage virtual and physical private Ethernet connectivity to assure critical applications perform as expected. They also can receive all or some of their most critical connectivity functions as a managed service, including managed connectivity, WiFi, security, voice and business continuity, among others.

CONCLUSION

New technologies loom on the horizon to help government agencies better serve their constituents, from answering billing queries to protecting sensitive data from cyber threats. The network on which these technologies run must be robust and flexible enough to handle the traffic and bandwidth demands of today and beyond.

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[1] “Gartner Survey Finds Government CIOs Spend 21 Percent of Their IT Budget on Digital Initiatives,” press release, Gartner, April 25, 2017 https://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/3693017

[2] “Process robotics in the federal government,” Public Sector Solutions web page, Deloitte, https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/pages/public-sector/solutions/federal-government-process-robotics.html

[3] William D. Eggers, David Schatsky, Dr. Peter Viechnicki, “How artificial intelligence could transform government,” executive summary, Deloitte, April 26, 2017, https://dupress.deloitte.com/dup-us-en/focus/cognitive-technologies/artificial-intelligence-government-summary.html?_ga=2.17808368.871295872.1509472479-881865455.1507121216

[4] RJ Krawiec, Vinn White, “Governing the future of mobility,” Deloitte, Aug. 3, 2017, https://dupress.deloitte.com/dup-us-en/focus/future-of-mobility/federal-government-and-transportation-of-the-future.html

[5] Ibid

[6] “Autonomous Vehicles for the U.S. Postal Service,” report, USPS Office of the Inspector General, Oct. 2, 2017, https://www.uspsoig.gov/sites/default/files/document-library-files/2017/RARC-WP-18-001.pdf

[8] “Official 2017 Annual Cybercrime Report,” Cybersecurity Ventures, October 2017, https://cybersecurityventures.com/hackerpocalypse-cybercrime-report-2016/

[9] “Global Cybersecurity Workforce Shortage to Reach 1.8 Million as Threats Loom Larger and Stakes Rise Higher,” news release, Center for Cyber Safety and Education, June 7, 2017 https://www.isc2.org/News-and-Events/Press-Room/Posts/2017/06/07/2017-06-07-Workforce-Shortage

 

How Technology Is Changing the World of Shipping Consumer Goods

Last Updated: January 14, 2019
By David Madden
Contributor to Wonolo, Inc. blog

The shipping industry has always operated with amazing efficiency and has generally been reluctant to adopt emerging  technologies that may be disruptive to their logistical systems. However, with higher consumer demands regarding shipping times and sustainable operations, operating in the digital age means the industry needs to take advantage of the benefits that new technologies must offer.

Consumers are purchasing more products online now than ever before; however, they still want the instantaneous gratification of a face-to-face purchase. This means that consumers are demanding faster turnaround on handling and shipping times.

This lack of contact between a brick-and-mortar vendor and customer means the burden of processing the orders now falls to the shipping company, or online vendor, in addition to shipping and delivering the product. This added logistical element makes adopting new technologies more important than ever.

Here are some of the ways that new technology is shaping the world of shipping.

Eco-Friendly Ships

Transporting products overseas is the first step of getting goods from the warehouse to the consumer, and 90% of this transportation is achieved via ship. But with increasing regulations regarding the environmental impact of ships, many companies are looking at more eco-friendly ways to transport goods overseas.

Recent research has looked at developing ships powered using sustainable energy, such as the wind. These wind-powered vessels would use trade winds and ocean currents to carry the ship from port to port. Though these ships may not be able to travel as quickly as gas-powered ships, they will also be constructed from lightweight materials to counter their slow travel times and, potentially, allow them to carry more freight.

Automated Ships and Trucks

One form of automation has already been implemented in the shipping industry with the use of automated cranes for transferring shipping containers from ship to shore. The future of shipping is heading beyond container handling to using automated vehicles and ships for transporting goods. Apple and Google both have autonomous vehicles in development, and this technology has big implications for the shipping industry.

Automated ships, directed from a central command center with minimal crew, would dramatically cut costs and potentially be more environmentally friendly. This automation would also cut down on human error which can account for onboard damage, slow delivery times, and loss of profit.

Trucks are also progressing toward automation, which will have a significant impact not only on the speed of delivery, as an unmanned truck can travel continuously without stopping, but also may benefit the environment. Trucks that are autonomously controlled can be driven at a slower pace and maximize their fuel efficiency.

Resurgence of Trains

Technology is not always just about new inventions; it is also about optimizing old technologies, which is the case with the predicted resurgence of train-based goods transportation.

Train freighting fell out of favor because of the high cost of fuel, and the significant carbon footprint of older modeled freight trains. With newer, cleaner technologies, and better infrastructure, trains look set to have a renaissance in the shipping industry by providing faster delivery routes, reducing the number of vehicles on the road for a smaller carbon footprint, and carrying more goods for more cost-effective transportation.

Smart Shipping with The Internet of Things

The Internet of Things is embedded into every industry, and it is revolutionizing the way that we collect data and process information—two integral factors for the shipping industry. Though ships have long been equipped with sensors to collect data, technological advancements now allow this data to be processed and sent in real time, further streamlining the shipping process. This real-time data can affect everything from route optimization, to tracking goods, to monitoring equipment.

This automation also extends to the delivery process, with smart technology taking over where GPS left off. Since the arrival of GPS, it has long been the standard means of navigation for delivery drivers. Unfortunately, like many early navigation systems, slow information processing and lack of up-to-date data left drivers with poor delivery routes which would cost them up to 29 hours per year in lost time. Improved sensors and real-time data collection can significantly reduce route confusion, allowing drivers to make more deliveries faster, effectively cutting costs.

Smart technology also opens the way for delivery sharing. Uber recently began offering deliveries as part of its driver’s service. So, using the same technology used to hail an Uber driver, you can organize for door-to-door delivery of goods.

Blockchain

Blockchain has been used in the financial sector as a more efficient means of recording data, and it has just recently been adopted by the shipping industry to replace labor intensive log books, spreadsheets, and individual databases.

The cloud-based application works by tracking the tens of millions of shipping containers that are transported annually, allows shipping companies to be more transparent, and encourages them to share information with other trading partners.

The implications for using this kind of digital technology in shipping is that it reduces the delivery times by simplifying the process of recording the travel logs, data spreadsheets, and inventory all into one system which cannot be altered by any single party without the go-ahead from the other parties involved in the transaction.

Though this may sound complicated, because it records every change chronologically, this prevents delays at port and minimizes human error and fraud, in turn reducing the cost of goods.

Robotic Processing Systems

One of the biggest areas for human error is at processing points, where mistakes with order selection, tracking numbers, and delivery destinations make processing a logistical nightmare. Fortunately, robotic technology has reached a point where it can be used to do most of the goods selection and processing.

Amazon has jumped on the robotics bandwagon with their purchase of Kiva Systems, a company that produces robots to retrieve customer orders from Amazon’s warehouses. This speed means that Amazon can fulfill more customers orders faster, effectively streamlining their shipping process.

Drone Deliveries

The final leg of the shipping process, delivery, is also set to benefit from the latest robotic technologies. Amazon recently made headlines with the first successful drone delivery, and its success looks to inspire the further use of drones in the shipping industry.

The benefit of drone deliveries is that it drastically cuts the cost of labor by reducing the number of vehicles on the roads, and it also has the potential to eliminate the challenges of accessing rural areas or difficult geographical locations, which can add to the cost of shipping.

Final Thoughts

Though often slow to take advantage of the latest technologies, the shipping industry with its ever-increasing consumer demands for speedily delivered goods needs to make some changes and embrace new technological innovations.

David Madden

David Madden is an efficiency expert and blogger at Exchanger Hub. His passion and business is to save companies money through the use of used reusable and repurposed industrial packaging such as plastic and metal bulk containers, gaylord boxes, bulk bags, pallets, ibc totes, and industrial racks.

 

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