Category Archives: Report

Infographic: The death of passwords

Enterprises need to start preparing for a future without traditional passwords, according to LoginRadius.

 

By Alison DeNisco Rayome, Senior Editor – TechRepublic | February 8, 2019, 4:00 AM PST

Enterprises trying to keep customer data safe struggle with weak links in traditional authentication methods and employee practices, according to a recent infographic from LoginRadius.

Most people fall into one of two categories: They use one password for every account, or they use a slightly different password for every account. However, neither of these approaches are very effective, the infographic noted. While 10 years ago, people only had to keep track of a password for email and banking, today, the average business user must keep track of nearly 200 passwords.

Companies including Microsoft are making moves to replace traditional passwords with biometrics and security keys. Others are beginning to realize that commonly accepted methods for creating strong passwords are not actually effective.

SEE: Password Policy (Tech Pro Research)

Here is the full infographic:

the-death-of-passwords-v01-02.jpg
Image: LoginRadius

What to Expect: Top 2019 HR Tech Trends

By Dave Zielinski, Contributing Writer – January 8, 2019

 

In 2019 HR will see growing adoption of “nudge-based” technology designed to encourage productive employee behaviors, more scrutiny of artificial intelligence tools and increased use of specialized “point” systems, according to technology industry experts who spoke with SHRM Online.

The new year also will see organizations continue to transition their core HR systems to the cloud and employ more AI-driven technologies to automate communication between HR and employees.

[SHRM members-only online discussion platform: SHRM Connect]

Here are the top technology trends experts expect to continue or emerge as HR turns the page to 2019:

‘Show Me’ Approach to Artificial Intelligence (AI)

HR technology leaders will become more diligent about keeping tabs on vendors’ AI tools, experts believe. The increased scrutiny will be due in part to highly-publicized cases like that at Amazon, where a home-grown recruiting algorithm was found to discriminate against women.

“We will see some push back on machine learning and AI next year [such as] testing its effectiveness and searching for potential bias,” said Stacey Harris, vice president of research and analytics for Alpharetta, Ga.-based HR research firm Sierra-Cedar. “With more organizations leveraging machine learning next year, there’ll be more data and examples on how any biases might be showing up.”

Sarah Brennan, founder and chief advisor of Milwaukee, Wis.-based HR consulting and research firm Accelir, said it’s important that buyers of AI tools look beyond vendor promises to ensure they’re getting products that do what they claim they can do.

“Don’t get caught up in the marketing hype,” Brennan said. “Make sure you ask vendors about their validation studies and use cases, because those with legitimate AI applications won’t hesitate to provide them.”

Sea Change in Engagement Measurement

Organizations are transforming how they measure employee engagement, and technology will continue to evolve to support that shift, experts say.

“We expect 2019 to be the first year that more organizations use nontraditional, technology-based listening techniques than they do the companywide annual survey to measure engagement,” said Brian Kropp, group vice president of the HR practice at research and advisory firm Gartner.

That development represents a significant change from just three years ago. In 2015 a Gartner study found 89 percent of medium-to-large organizations were using an enterprisewide annual survey to assess engagement, while only 30 percent were using nontraditional methods like analyzing employee movement data—tracking where employees spend their time via technology embedded in ID badges—or computer usage data that tracks how employees use e-mail, internal collaboration networks, websites and more.

“Companies have become more comfortable with scraping across employees’ calendars and e-mails to get a better understanding of current sentiment and organizational culture with the goal of improving engagement levels,” Kropp said.

Brennan believes engagement platforms will see the highest adoption rates among all HR technology categories next year. “For the first time there are good engagement technologies available for companies of all sizes and at all price points,” she said.

Rise of ‘Nudge-based’ Technologies

Kropp said HR technologies that suggest certain behaviors will grow in popularity in 2019. One such technology can monitor employee activity at a computer workstation. “It might send a message saying, ‘You have been at your desk for X amount of time and it appears you’re losing focus, so now might be a good time to get up and go for a short walk,’ ” Kropp said.

An example is Cultivate, software works as a digital coach for managers. It analyzes data from e-mail, internal collaboration systems and calendars to assess how managers spend their time interacting with direct reports. The tool then uses machine learning to give managers suggestions for how they might improve their team’s performance, such as spending more time with certain employees.

Rachel Ernst, vice president of employee success at vendor Reflektive, said there’s also an ongoing movement to embed performance management within the flow of daily work.

“The technology can now send automatic nudges to managers to remind them to give feedback to employees as well as deliver short videos to provide guidance on how to conduct review discussions or give effective recognition,” she said. “This keeps HR from having to send regular e-mail to managers to remind them of these essential tasks.”

Growing Importance of the HRIT Role

Sierra-Cedar’s 2018-2019 HR Systems industry survey found the role of the human resource information technology (HRIT) specialist is growing in strategic importance and Harris expects that trend to continue. In cloud environments these roles are 1.5 times more likely to be responsible for data security and technology configuration decisions than IT or functional roles, the survey found.

Harris said that it’s important for the HR staff to have specialized IT roles, even as other functions like finance or marketing don’t, “because HR touches everyone in a company and HR deals with more data privacy and integration issues than most other disciplines in the company.”

Faster Migration of Core HR Systems to the Cloud

A 2018 study from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) found that 75 percent of surveyed companies now have at least one HR process in the cloud. Forty percent have core HR systems like an HR management system there, said Dan Staley, a global HR technology leader with PwC. Another 26 percent of respondents said they planned to move a core system to the cloud in the next one to three years.

“Moving a core system to the cloud is a barometer of how serious organizations are about that technology,” Staley said. “Large organizations with complex requirements like international payroll or union populations have resisted moving core systems to the cloud in the past because they felt the technology wasn’t mature enough. But with cloud products having proven themselves over the past decade, companies are now moving there en masse.”

Renewed Interest in ‘Point’ Solutions

More organizations will consider adding “point” or specialized technology solutions to their portfolios in 2019. These systems address individual areas of HR like recruiting, performance management or engagement and are often the target of innovation from small or emerging vendors. Brennan believes popular ones will be talent acquisition systems, chatbot applications for recruiting and answering employees’ HR-related questions, and engagement platforms.

“Few of the full-suite vendors have invested in the talent acquisition portion of their suites in the same manner as point system providers,” she said.

Point systems can now be more quickly integrated with broader talent management suites by using application programming interfaces (APIs). “Integrations that used to take six to nine months now take six to nine days with the right APIs,” Brennan said.

‘Push’ Recommendations from AI

The accelerating application of AI to workforce data will allow relevant information to “find” employees at the point of need, experts say. Cristina Goldt, vice president of HCM products at Workday, said AI will enable simpler navigation of learning and development options as well as easier execution of tasks like onboarding, benefits selection and IT service ticketing.

For example, Goldt said, a newly-promoted sales manager might benefit from this type of AI by being “pushed” recommended learning content for leadership training, suggested workplace connections and a list of potential mentors that went through similar transitions; a set of onboarding tasks that direct her to set up sales targets, enter forecasts and review the pipeline in a customer relationship management system; and a snapshot of team members to help her get to know them better.

Learning, Performance and Career Planning Converge

Vendors in the learning, performance management and career planning markets will “play more in each other’s spaces,” said Dani Johnson, co-founder and principal analyst of Red Thread Research, a HR research and advisory firm in Salt Lake City, Utah.

“We’re seeing more learning vendors get into performance and more performance and career vendors operate in the learning market,” Johnson said. “One reason for the convergence is it’s hard to develop someone effectively unless you already know where they stand in regard to their performance and career plans.”

Johnson said there’s also a growing number of content-based point solutions in the learning market designed to integrate with internal communication platforms like Slack. “It’s about taking learning to employees rather than make them come to the learning,” she said.

Dave Zielinski is a freelance business writer and editor in Minneapolis.

Five Predictions for How Technology Will Change Sports in 2019

Might the NFL launch an esports league in 2019? (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

By , Senior Writer – SportTechie /December 28, 2018

If 2018 were the year that sports betting was legalized, major deals were reached across mobile ticketing and biometric verification, and sports streaming services launched at an unprecedented pace, threatening to dethrone cable TV, 2019 will be the year they all hit a stride.

In 2019, niche sports will continue to grow in popularity as streaming services gain steam, sports betting will become accessible at venues, biometric IDs will be used to buy beer at games, esports will create further inroads in traditional sports, and athletes will further embrace wearable technology, digital video, and virtual reality to enhance their skills and marketability.

Sports Betting at Venues

States across the U.S. are working to adopt sports betting following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in May that opened up the legalization of gambling. One thing is for certain as we head into 2019: sports betting will be more commonplace and more widely accepted.

More states will move to embrace betting while regulators start to pass laws that protect athletes, leagues, and gamblers. But another thing fans might come to expect in 2019 is access to sports betting terminals at the venues themselves. In November, MGM Resorts CEO Jim Murren hinted at this possibility at a conference. Murren said that MGM, which owns the Vegas Golden Knights’ T-Mobile Arena alongside AEG, was eyeing plans to test sports betting kiosks at the venue during Knights games. Murren shortly thereafter hedged that statement, saying that it wasn’t in the cards just yet. But his intention has been set.

Elsewhere in the sports world teams and leagues will continue to work sports betting capability into new and existing apps. Interactive mobile game maker Xperiel is currently working with MGM Resorts and the New York Jets to build sports betting into the Jets’ existing in-app prediction game, “I Called It.”

“Sports gambling becomes less of a gamble,” said Xperiel cofounder and CEO Alex Hertel in a note on 2019 tech predictions. “We will see a rift between the desires of the gambler and the regulating bodies that could end up driving some sports betters away. Immersive technology that engages fans will help make them stay.”

Mobile Ticketing and Biometrics

In 2019, mobile ticketing might not just become commonplace to pass through many venue gates, but it may become required. Meanwhile fans will be increasingly incentivized to use their biometrics for verification.

In 2018, major ticketing companies, from Ticketmaster to Seatgeek, moved to couple together the primary and secondary ticketing markets to help teams maintain control over prices and attendance data. After the NFL expanded its partnership with Ticketmaster in 2017 in an attempt to control more secondary-market sales, in 2018 a number of teams started to embrace a mobile-first ticketing strategy. This will continue into the new year, but with the added integration of biometrics.

In the MLB, biometric verification company Clear (which has a presence alongside TSA Pre✓ at airports) entered into a multi-year deal this past year with the league and its ticketing partner Tickets.com to do just that. As part of the deal, Clear agreed to leverage Tickets.com’s API to enable members to link their Clear profile with their MLB.com account to gain entry into games with a fingerprint scan. In the near future, facial recognition is expected to be added as well. The partnership was piloted at select MLB ballparks this past season, with a broader roll-out planned for 2019.

Also next year, biometric verification will expand beyond the gates and into venues. Clear was approved in the state of Washington this year to use its services to verify identities of people looking to purchase beer at Seattle Seahawks, Mariners and Sounders games. The company has since been in talks with regulators in other states to expand this elsewhere in the U.S.

Streaming and Consolidation

A number of streaming services offering extensive live sports programming launched in the U.S. this year, from ESPN+ to DAZN. This has created a fragmented market for sports streaming, while enabling fans to reduce their dependence on traditional cable. In 2019, streaming brands will scoop up new digital rights at a rapid pace, spanning not only major sports but niche ones as well.

We’ve already started to see this, with NBC adding a number of niche sports (from skiing to motocross) on its paid streaming service NBC Sports Gold. ESPN+ has similarly emphasized lesser-known sporting events, while DAZN has entered the U.S. market with a focus on combat sports.

In the new year, digital rights will continue to find their way into the hands of these major players, which will help to tighten their hold on the market. This might also give some of these streaming companies the fuel to begin trouncing (and potentially even scooping up) some rivals, igniting a more mature wave of consolidation within the industry.

Wearables and Privacy

In 2018, Whoop, the wearable company that partnered with the NFL Players Association last year to track player strain and recovery, secured a $25 million Series C funding round led by UAE71 Capital with participation from the NFLPA, Kevin Durant, and former NBA Commissioner David Stern.

In 2019, wearables and RFID trackers will continue to be pushed onto athletes to meet the insatiable appetite of fans and coaches for data. But with this proliferation of wearable devices in professional sports, innovation will continue to push against privacy.

The NFL’s CBA is set to expire in 2020. The next wave of negotiations between the league and NFLPA will likely begin in 2019, bringing many of these issues to the forefront. Under the terms of the NFLPA’s deal with Whoop, NFL players maintain ownership of their health data, and are also able to commercialize that data through the NFLPA’s licensing program.

According to Sean Sansiveri, the NFLPA’s vice president of business and legal affairs, if a market for athletes’ biometric data should ever arise, the union will have an established mechanism in place to ensure that professional football players are not only protected but also well-positioned to profit off their private data if they choose to do so. The Supreme Court’s ruling on sports betting in May, and the expanding state-by-state legalization of sports betting, might well create exactly that market.

NFL Launches an Esports League

While esports and traditional sports merged at an unprecedented rate this year with the launch of the NBA 2K and investments in esports teams by sports franchises, this trend will accelerate in 2019. NASCAR has already announced that it is hopping on the esports league bandwagon heading into the new year. The NFL has been slower to adopt esports, however the league earlier this year posted a job looking for a “head of gaming and esports” that would be based in its New York headquarters and lead the “strategic planning, partner management and execution of the League’s gaming efforts.” Perhaps 2019 is the year that Madden NFL gamers can go pro.

Rise of the Drones – Managing the Unique Risks Associated with Unmanned Aircraft Systems


Report – Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty

Drones or unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) used to be primarily associated with military operations. Today, compact versions are increasingly operating in everyday life and the UAS industry is fast becoming a multi-billion dollar business, as the benefits to be gained from utilizing such innovative technology become apparent.
This Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS) report examines the key issues and trends underpinning rapid growth in usage of UAS and provides insight into the potential risk exposures related to their deployment in the private, public and commercial realms.

> Download the full report Rise of the Drones – Managing the Unique Risks Associated with Unmanned Aircraft Systems

> Download the Executive Summary of the report

 

UAS have the potential to both solve problems and save costs in the future across a number of industries, throughout the developing world and in disaster relief scenarios. Growth projections for the sector are significant as UAS become cheaper to purchase, smaller in size and easier to operate. In fact, the UAS industry is regarded by many as the most dynamic growth sector of the global aerospace industry.

However, as civilian and commercial use of UAS rapidly increases and continues to evolve, the potential for misuse of this technology needs to be considered. Advances in technology are inevitably accompanied by a host of new and little understood risks. There have already been enough incidents and near-misses to date involving UAS to generate concern that the likelihood of collisions and other loss events will grow as UAS numbers multiply.

/assets/ContentImages471x160/White%20Papers%20and%20Case%20Studies/Drones%20Report%202016/AGCS-UAS-Microdrones_471x160.jpg

Photo: microdrones.

The landscape today

Use of drones or unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in public airspace is increasing dramatically. In the US, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) projects that by the end of 2016 over 600,000 UAS will be deployed for commercial use – three times the amount of manned general aviation aircraft. In addition, 1.9 million UAS are expected to be in recreational use. The number of UAS is set to triple by 2020. (1)

Globally, UAS market volume is forecast to reach 4.7 million (2) units by 2020 (other estimates are even higher), with the market for commercial application of UAS technology estimated to soar from $2bn to $127bn (3). Such projections are driven by UAS becoming cheaper, smaller and easier to use, as well as regulatory progress.

> Read more

UAS – The nuts and bolts: Types of UAS

/assets/ContentImages471x160/White%20Papers%20and%20Case%20Studies/Drones%20Report%202016/AGCS-UAS-Types_large.jpg (Click to enlarge)
Graphic in German

Uses and benefits

Piloted remotely on the ground via control stations, UAS are increasingly used for menial or dangerous tasks, potentially solving problems and overcoming challenges across numerous countries and industries, improving the safety of thousands of workers every year and significantly reducing costs.

UAS are commercially used in a variety of situations, the most popular of which are industrial inspections, aerial photography, agriculture (surveying crops) and law enforcement. As UAS technology penetrates further, a decline in workers compensation losses can be anticipated, particularly related to building inspections. Insurers are also increasingly utilizing UAS to survey loss damage from floods and other catastrophic events, to help alleviate distress and damage to victims and property more quickly.

Emerging UAS usage includes delivering blood and vaccines to remote locations in Africa, as monitoring tools to prevent the exploitation of slave labor in Brazil, fighting grass fires and even delivering pizza and coffee. Subsidiary UAS industries are also being created, such as the emergence of third party “drone for service” vendors, who rent UAS to commercial operators.

> Read more

UAS – The nuts and bolts: Featured Technology
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(Click to enlarge)
Graphic in German

The risk landscape

As recreational and commercial UAS usage increases, new risk exposures are emerging. More incidents likely will occur once regulations are finalized that encourage more widespread use. Such incidents could result in multi-million dollar claims against businesses, operators and manufacturers.

Hobbyists account for the majority of UAS owners yet remain largely unregulated in many countries, raising safety concerns, as many can be untrained and inexperienced. Insurers have already seen loss activity resulting from novice control of UAS. Regardless of technological sophistication or operator skill, however, accidents happen.

UAS raise two priority safety concerns: mid-air collisions and the loss of control. A collision can occur if the pilot cannot see and avoid manned aircraft in time. Most at risk are manned aircraft which fly below 500 feet, such as helicopters, agricultural planes and aircraft landing or departing from airports.

Loss of control can result from system failure or flying beyond signal range; a major risk that has already caused incidents involving injuries. A scenario involving a pilot losing control of a UAS during a building inspection could result in a loss easily in excess of $5m. Damage from “foreign objects”, such as bird strikes for example, is already an issue for the aviation sector, as it is the fifth largest generator of insurance claims (6). A collision involving a UAS striking the engine of an airliner could cause $10m in physical damage alone.

/assets/ContentImages471x160/White%20Papers%20and%20Case%20Studies/Drones%20Report%202016/AGCS-UAS-Microdrones_471x160_2.jpg

As with manned aircraft there are concerns UAS may be used for malicious acts. An emerging peril is the potential threat from UAS being used to target critical infrastructure. There have been a number of incidents of drone overflights at power stations. There are also concerns that UAS could be utilized to attack sports stadiums or other events where large crowds gather.

Other risk scenarios include the prospect of hackers “spoofing” a UAS radio signal, potentially leading to a crash, the potential loss or theft of valuable recorded data when the device is transmitting information to the control station or after the flight by cyber-attack when the data has been stored. In addition to data protection, there are also many public concerns around such issues as privacy and trespass and nuisance.

Increasing use of UAS is also altering the risk profile of many industries. For example, a real estate agent has little bodily injury exposure but this changes if it engages UAS to take aerial photographs.

> Read more

Regulation

Regulations have been a significant barrier to more widespread use of UAS. Standards differ remarkably around the world, as evidenced by the hundreds of working groups trying to harmonize rules. Another challenge is posed by the fact that regulations cannot keep pace with technological advancement.

In most cases, the designation between commercial and recreational UAS use is the starting point. Other common standards exist such as visual line of sight (VLOS) requirements for pilots, size restrictions (usually <55 lbs/25 kg.), and restrictions against operating UAS near airports or outdoor venues.

New rules for commercial use in the US (effective August 2016) represent a milestone as they lower the barrier to entry for new commercial users and are expected to significantly increase the number of units in operation. These new regulations will likely influence other countries to adopt similar laws. The European Union (EU) is also working towards UAS rules.

> Read more

Improving UAS safety: insurance and risk mitigation

As UAS ownership grows so will expectations around safety education. Operators should make this a top priority and obtain the necessary training and experience to competently pilot their UAS.

Training is crucial to reducing the number of incidents and operators should focus on flight time calculation, meteorology, security checks for aircraft navigation systems, emergency instructions, and air traffic law. For businesses, additional training should include on-board camera image uses, flight communications and planning, system maintenance and a host of other technological issues. Even basic safety checklists can help.

In many countries UAS registration is not required, causing problems for insurers and claimants. Identification of both UAS and operator will be essential for maintaining proper liability in future. Introduction of car registration-style schemes will help.

Insurance can protect both operators and the public from risk of mid-air collision, as well as physical or property damage or injury to others. Manufacturers, owners and operators of UAS are exposed to a number of risks, as are businesses which sell and service UAS.

If growth projections for the commercial UAS industry in the US materialize, there is potential for the drone insurance market to be worth $500m+ by end of 2020. Globally, its value could be approaching $1bn (7).

> Read more

###

(1) FAA Aerospace Forecast FY2016-2036
(2) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Market, By Value and Volume Analysis and Forecast 2015-2020 – Research and Markets
(3) Drones will take $127bn worth of human work by 2020, PwC says. Clarity from above – PricewaterhouseCoopers
(4) New Era for Aviation: Opening the Aviation Market for Civil Use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems In A Safe and Sustainable Manner – European Commission, 2014
(5) Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty
(6) Global Claims Review, Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty
(7) Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty

How technology is tackling human trafficking

18/07/2018
By Alexon Bell, Global Head of AML and Compliance at Quantexa
Contributor to Global Banking & Finance Review

 

Technology is both a blessing and a curse for officials fighting against human trafficking.

With the rise of social media and a world growing smaller through communication platforms, alongside the accessibility of online advertisements and encrypted messaging apps, traffickers have a host of technologies at their fingertips to help entrap victims, advertise their services and cover up the trafficker’s own illegal activity.

However, new technologies are becoming increasingly sophisticated and are playing a key role in eliminating human trafficking. Some are used to discover and rescue victims, others to identify networks of perpetrators. Many of these advancements are beginning to empower governments to source the root of trafficking rings and stop the activity at its core. In turn, this puts a new and heavier responsibility onto banks and corporates to innovate and improve their systems to themselves spot any nefarious activity and feed this back into the global effort against trafficking.

Spotting victims

At the heart of each case of human trafficking is a victim, but knowing the identity of this victim is difficult. Hundreds of images of abused children are shared online every day – even if all of these are flagged, many will be duplicates of cases that have already been actioned. Understanding whether an image is a duplicate or a new photo – which would require a new response from law enforcement – is difficult as such images are hard to track.

Previously, traffickers wanting to proliferate an image could make small tweaks to it, such as adding marks or a resizing the photo. This creates a distinct image, making it impossible to trace back altered duplicates using traditional methods.

Now, technologies are being used to outsmart traffickers and distinguish new and existing images faster. For example, Microsoft PhotoDNA imposes a fine grid over an image and assigns a numerical value to each square, representing the “hash” – like a DNA signature for the image. Rather than scanning for whole images, the program matches a numerical hash against a database of known illegal images to match duplicate images instantly.

To help law enforcement turn this innovation into positive action, Thorn – a tech start-up founded by Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore to fight child sexual abuse and trafficking – has partnered with Microsoft to allow organisations to add to and access a centralised hash sharing database. New images that have not been hashed are reported as belonging to a new victim – meaning law enforcement is alerted to a new victim sooner. This accelerates victim discovery and therefore, hopefully, rescue.

Preventing victim entrapment

Many perpetrators of modern day slavery use contract substitution to entrap their victims. Recruiters offer a lucrative contract to lure individuals abroad, but this is then reworded – often in a language the victim does not understand. Innovators are hoping that blockchain technology may soon help prevent this deception, if governments were to only issue visas when signed contracts are confirmed by the blockchain as matching those originally provided to the individual.

Finding traffickers

Traffickers can use technology to obscure their activity, but technology is also revolutionising the way officials are finding criminal networks. The key is joining the dots of information from NGOs, news sources, databases of known traffickers and details available to institutions such as banks.

Traditional human intelligence is gathered on the ground in a particular country by charities, looking at news sources, hearsay and other resources at their disposal. With many charities operating within one country alone, and much trafficking happening between countries, this information often then needs to be shared with governmental and intra-governmental organisations to compile a profile of a trafficker or activity more broadly. This traditional intelligence, however, is usually not enough to rapidly identify a network of traffickers.

Now, institutions like banks are helping combine this human intelligence with innovative technologies which joins the dots of information from these organisations with the bank’s own internal data and other third party sources. Using big data, artificial intelligence software is able to find links between individuals and their transactions, addresses, associates and company ties, alongside a mass of other relevant information which may suggest nefarious activity when seen in its proper context. By resolving these separate entities, AI tech can build a detailed picture of a criminal’s network, putting an individual transaction or relationship in its wider context. Using a combination of human intelligence and digitally compiled insight, organisations can identify traffickers and their connections.

While some technologies are accelerating trafficking, others are vital in tackling against this devastating crime. The combination of human intelligence, artificial intelligence and the sharing of information is starting to pay dividends.

Whether helping to identify victims, preventing them being ensnared or detecting traffickers themselves, innovative technology is helping at every stage of the fight against trafficking, enhancing processes to make every effort more efficient, effective and accurate – and, ultimately, life-saving.

————————————–

Side note to this article/report by Alexon Bell: I will be following up on the human trafficking issue in the near future with a Commentary. It will include key links to Fact Sheets, Quantexa’s specific involvement, including other organizations on the front lines. You may consider becoming involved (directly, donations to key organizations, etc.), and those sources will be added as well.

Bill Owen – TechNewsBlog.net

 

What Does Big Tech Know About You? Basically Everything


By Angela Moscaritolo, contributing PCMag reporter – Feb. 5, 2019, 6 p.m.

Security Baron examined the privacy policies of Facebook, Google, Apple, Twitter, Amazon, and Microsoft and put together a handy infographic showing the types of data each company admits to collecting.

The seemingly endless stream of Facebook privacy scandals of late—including the latest involving users as young as 13 years old—may have you questioning how much the social network and other tech giants actually know about you.

Here’s a hint: practically everything.

The folks at Security Baron examined the privacy policies of Facebook, Google, Apple, Twitter, Amazon, and Microsoft and put together a handy infographic showing the types of data each company admits to collecting. For Facebook and others, data is money. But just how much these tech giants actually know about you might be surprising.

As you can see in the infographic below, Facebook is particularly data-hungry, even gathering information about your work, income level, race, religion, political views, and the ads you click in addition to more commonly collected data points such as your phone number, email address, location, and the type of devices you use.

“Facebook is unusually aggressive,” Security Baron pointed out. “This data can be exploited by advertisers and (hopefully not nefarious) others.”

Twitter, in comparison, is “comparatively hands-off,” the site notes. The microblogging service, for instance, doesn’t collect your name, gender, or birthday (Facebook, Google, and Microsoft all do), but Twitter does know your phone number, email address, time zone, what videos you watch, and more.

Google and Microsoft, meanwhile, are the other big players when it comes to collecting data.

“With Cortana listening in and Gmail seeing all of your emails, the ubiquitous nature of Google and Microsoft gives them access to an uncomfortably large amount of your information,” Security Baron wrote.

Check out the full infographic below to see what Facebook, Google, Apple, Twitter, Amazon, and Microsoft may know about you. For tips on securing your digital privacy, check our story, “Online Data Protection 101: Don’t Let Big Tech Get Rich Off Your Info.

Security Baron The Data Big Tech Companies Have On You full

Angela Moscaritolo – Reporter

Angela has been a PCMag reporter since January 2012. Prior to joining the team, she worked as a reporter for SC Magazine, covering everything related to hackers and computer security. Angela has also written for The Northern Valley Suburbanite in New Jersey, The Dominion Post in West Virginia, and the Uniontown-Herald Standard in Pennsylvania. She is a graduate of West Virginia University’s Perely Isaac Reed School of Journalism.

Why cloud security is the top IT budget priority for 2019

Research from Threat Stack found that 54% of companies are worried about outgrowing their current security solutions.

By – Senior Editor, TechRepublic – October 18, 2018


https://tek.io/2AYytKd

More than half of companies (54%) share the fear that they may soon outgrow their current security solutions, according to a new report from Threat Stack. In a Thursday press release, the company explained that shifts in corporate infrastructure will lead most of those companies surveyed to prioritize cloud workload security and intrusion detection systems (IDS) in their 2019 budgets.

So, why cloud security? Only 41% of respondent infrastructure remain on-premises, the release said. Businesses are increasingly migrating to alternate infrastructure options like IaaS (25%), PaaS (17%), and containers (10%).

Over the next two years, budgets overall are expected to increase about 19%, the release said. In addition to security, many companies leaders are also prioritizing DevOps investments as a way to stay on top of changing infrastructure trends.

DevSecOps, a security-focused approach to DevOps, is often listed as a goal in most firms, but isn’t implemented properly. In fact, 91% said they believed development teams were introducing new risk to the organization due to their required access for the following three things:

  1. Sensitive corporate information (45%)
  2. Personally identifiable information (40%)
  3. Root-level permissions (34%)

According to the release, some 29% of those surveyed said they believe their organization places priority on code that simply works over code that is secure. However, security teams have their own challenges with 63% saying they believe they slow down the business, but nearly three-quarters saying they’re expected to match pace with the DevOps teams.

There is a misalignment in what is happening across security and the development and operations teams, the release said; and how the companies are approaching this now isn’t working. Some 52% said their current security strategy isn’t setting them up for future growth.

While budgets are expected to increase, 90% of respondents said they’re facing challenges with allocation. It’s hard to find solutions that are affordable and scalable, properly evaluate vendors, and match the strategy of their department budget with that of the company overall.

The big takeaways for tech leaders:
  • 54% of companies are worried that they might outgrow their current security solutions, putting them at greater risk. — Threat Stack, 2018
  • 91% of company leaders believe that development teams are introducing new risks to their organization. — Threat Stack, 2018
SEE: Cloud migration decision tool (Tech Pro Research)
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